Posted by Geoff April 11, 2007

It didn't seem right not having an Easter-related post, however late it is.



Anyway...the Egg Qee - yeah i know, not very Easter... truly one of the most under-rated toys out there. Just having a look around a few sites made me realise what a great piece it is - the blank 8" version is a sublime platform. Seriously...there's space galore for doodles, designs and much more.



The Qee tour had some great Egg customs that I thought were the best in the show. Check out Kei Sawada's - a thing of beauty.









And the production versions are pretty tasty (sorry couldn't resist) - Baseman's Hump Qee, Biskup's Polska and of course #94...better known as Soto's Terrarium Keeper. But it's not just the biggies - the Motug 2" series also included a couple of corkers - NYCLase and CES. Then there's Playskewl's "Hot Shot" and Hayon's Clone Egg.



It's high time the Egg Qee got some love!

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